Exercise Induced Asthma

Question:
My son suffers pretty much the same symptoms.   I don’t know if your son has tried this, but mine actually cradles his inhaler and aerochamber in one hand during the race and uses it as necessary.  He’s done this in both track and cross-country.  The coach notifies the officials before the race and there has never been a problem with it.   Paul Muto

Response:
any suggestions for treating exercise induced asthma in a 17 yr. old high school cross country runner? he is already tried 4 different inhalers. he gets an attack about 1 mile into a 5k race. any help would be greatly appreciated by me, his concerned dad

My doctor has me on Beclovant which is used twice a day.  4 puffs in the morning, 4 puffs in the evening.  It is more of a preventance approach.  I’ve been taking this for several months and have not had any problems, none associated with EIA anyway.   I have talked to Sue Latshaw and she is into herbal remedies and acupuncture.   It seems to work well for her since she’s won a few triathlons this year. Good luck, Tom

Response:
writes:  2. the exercise asthma typically eased up after a  half hour or so into the run, like a second wind effect.  again, the key concern would be that the theo. kicks up your heartrate temporarily.  but if your kid is young and strong without heart ills, it should help him as it helps me.  the  other key would be a lllooong warmup period prior to top exertion, as much as an hour of light work.  astmatics definitely need to warm up their lungs as well as their legs, more so than regular joes.

Well said. I’ve also heard (not from personal experience as I don’t have EIA), tha the best warmup for EIA is not just long, but one in which the intensity rises and falls a number of times, with each rise getting progressively harder. JT

Response:
: any suggestions for treating exercise induced asthma in a 17 yr. old high : school cross country runner? he is already tried 4 different inhalers. he : gets an attack about 1 mile into a 5k race. any help would be greatly : appreciated by me, his concerned dad I take two hits each of Intal and Proventil about 15 to 30 minutes before exercise (i.e. before I change and stretch).  This works well for me. Before the swim start of triathlons I’ve found that in addition to this, I need to run a hundred yards or so a few times in a row, first slow, then a little faster, but not all out.  Then I rest for 10 or 15 minutes, during pre-race announcements and start waves before mine, and when I hit the water I don’t get EIA, as I do if I don’t warm up first. I hope this helps.   Heide Estes New York City

See also  Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment

Response:
any suggestions for treating exercise induced asthma in a 17 yr. old high school cross country runner? he is already tried 4 different inhalers. he gets an attack about 1 mile into a 5k race. any help would be greatly appreciated by me, his concerned dad

Response:
I am a twenty three year old cross country runner with asthma. I found that using the ventolin inhaler atleast one hour before running is beneficial.  I have learned to avoid using any corticosteriod inhalers (ie Beclaforte) until after running is finished.  None of this is based on medical theory, it’s just what I do with myself and may be worth trying. Also, if I am feeling particularly wheezy before I go out I have a cup of coffee.   – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – any suggestions for treating exercise induced asthma in a 17 yr. old high school cross country runner? he is already tried 4 different inhalers. he gets an attack about 1 mile into a 5k race. any help would be greatly appreciated by me, his concerned dad

Response:
any suggestions for treating exercise induced asthma in a 17 yr. old high school cross country runner? he is already tried 4 different inhalers. he gets an attack about 1 mile into a 5k race. any help would be greatly appreciated by me, his concerned dad

I’ve tried, of and on, all morning to find the href to a page someone put on WWW regarding exercise induced asthma – I think it’s either buried in Runner’s World’s pages, or in Dr. Pribut’s pages? In any event, this one pager suggests, besides using inhalers, to start every training exercise with a couple of sprints — i.e. run a 100 yards, walk awhile, repeat.  This forces the body to produce adreneline, which dilates the bronchia (which is what the inhalers are supposed to do also).  I know the inhalers take awhile.  I have EIA, and it takes a good mile or so before I’m breathing normally. Maybe someone else knows the href? Bill

Response:
any suggestions for treating exercise induced asthma in a 17 yr. old high school cross country runner? he is already tried 4 different inhalers. he gets an attack about 1 mile into a 5k race. any help would be greatly appreciated by me, his concerned dad

assuming the four inhalers include the usual suspects–ventolin, serevent, intal, azmacort, etc., etc….i’d suggest asking your doc about a quick-hitting theotphylline tab or capsule.  there are some out there which hit the system within a half hour or so and wear off after about 90 mins. or so…my doc said this would work for me because 1. my heart was strong and 2. the exercise asthma typically eased up after a  half hour or so into the run, like a second wind effect.  again, the key concern would be that the theo. kicks up your heartrate temporarily.  but if your kid is young and strong without heart ills, it should help him as it helps me.  the  other key would be a lllooong warmup period prior to top exertion, as much as an hour of light work.  astmatics definitely need to warm up their lungs as well as their legs, more so than regular joes.  cheers the finish line

See also  Stopping repetitive swallowing

Response:
When I run in temps below around 50 F, I become particularly prone to developing asthma when I run.  I can complete a run without having asthma as long as I keep the exertion level low (low speed, little hills).  In warmer temps, asthma is very rare for me even when I go all out in a race.  Any ideas … how do I prevent an asthma from developing in the cold?  Basically the faster I breathe, and the colder it is, the more prone I am to have asthma.           thanks,  Gale   — |Gale Richmond Stafford                     |Life is what happens to you     | |University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign |while you’re busy making other  |

Response:
When I run in temps below around 50 F, I become particularly prone to developing asthma when I run.  I can complete a run without having asthma as long as I keep the exertion level low (low speed, little hills).  In warmer temps, asthma is very rare for me even when I go all out in a race.  Any ideas … how do I prevent an asthma from developing in the cold?  Basically the faster I breathe, and the colder it is, the more prone I am to have asthma.      thanks,  Gale

Odds are that you are seeing a broncial reaction to the cold and possibly dryness – IMHO of course, I’m not a doctor but I have exercise-induced asthma. . .I keep mine under control with 300 mg of theophylinn twice a day and an inhaler, using the latter just before running.  My advice is to see your doctor about an inhaler, there are lots of different ones, and each acts a little differently. Your doctor should have access to samples for you to try to see what works best.  If he/she is unwilling to do that, change doctors.  After all you pay them to solve your problem – and the answer is not to “stop running”.

Response:
When I run in temps below around 50 F, I become particularly prone to developing asthma when I run.  I can complete a run without having asthma as long as I keep the exertion level low (low speed, little hills).  In warmer temps, asthma is very rare for me even when I go all out in a race.  Any ideas … how do I prevent an asthma from developing in the cold?  Basically the faster I breathe, and the colder it is, the more prone I am to have asthma.      thanks,  Gale   —

See also  Breathing difficulties

Gale, I’ve always had the same problem, but I found the answer to it in an old boxing book by the Manassa Mangler ( I can’t remember his real name, it’s on the tip of my tongue and starts with a d, very very famous boxer).  Anyway, the answer is to drink something hot just before you go running.  Tea or beef buillion work great for me.  I don’t know why exactly it works, but I know from experience that it does.  I’ts not the caffeine, because I have used non-caffeing drinks.  I think this will help,  Kyle Kane Stephens

Response:
[Meaningful health-related discussion deleted to allow room for trivial fact] Gale, I’ve always had the same problem, but I found the answer to it in an old boxing book by the Manassa Mangler ( I can’t remember his real name, it’s on the tip of my tongue and starts with a d, very very famous boxer).

The Manassa Mauler was Jack Dempsey. — Joseph Aloysius McVeigh | “The image of a ‘noncompetitive, poor America’ just        “N.I.N.A.”       |           Portfolio Manager Mark Holowesko

Response:
When I run in temps below around 50 F, I become particularly prone to developing asthma when I run.  I can complete a run without having asthma as long as I keep the exertion level low (low speed, little hills).  In warmer temps, asthma is very rare for me even when I go all out in a race.  Any ideas … how do I prevent an asthma from developing in the cold?  Basically the faster I breathe, and the colder it is, the more prone I am to have asthma.          thanks,  Gale

I think in the latest issue of Triathlete magazine, there is an article on competing with asthma and the things you can do to improve your performance. I haven’t read it yet, but the magazine always provides great information. Bye, Joe — My postings/letters are flame proof.  If you’ve taken offense, you may have misunderstood me.  If you differ with me, that’s just fine and your response is welcome.  ****Please place at all locations you feel necessary.****

Response:
Related Articles